Test Study Technique

A test study technique I use is called the A-B-C method. I ask the student to label all vocabulary and concepts with an A, B or C.

A means that the student knows the information without hesitation.

B means the student knows the information but is somewhat hesitant in explaining it.

C means the student does not know the information and needs to work to learn it.

Then the student should start with the C’s. After really learning the C’s, the student should work on the B’s. Then the student should just review the A’s 3 days before the test.

What is really important here is that the student is honest about his/her knowledge. It is important to stress that it does not make any difference the number of C’s because they are going to really learn them.

Need help with a student? Contact Beth Silver, The Education Sage, at 310-720-0390 or bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Beth’s website is educationsage.net.

Get Organized

Get organized! Make sure your student has everything needed with which to do homework, study and projects.

Teachers may have different requirements for classes. Make sure your student knows the difference and has the proper materials.

Extra binder paper, pens, and pencils are important.

Make sure your student has times when to do homework. A quiet study area is important. The kitchen table is not the best place for doing and learning school work. If the student needs supervision, find a place where checking with the student is easy but out of the way of the flow of other household activities.

Need help with your student? Contact Beth Silver at 310-720-0390 or bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Beth’s website is educationsage.net.

Early Warning Signs

School has been in session long enough this year for possible problems to appear. It is important to look at these areas: student getting along with teacher(s); student completing homework; student’s scores on tests and student’s attitude about going to school.

The best way to begin to handle issues in these areas is to meet with the classroom teacher(s). Sometimes just clarifying what the teacher expects of the student is enough to bring clarity to how the student should be working. In a meeting such as this, the student will appreciate getting the teacher’s attention and understanding more about how to work.

Don’t wait when things start to be issues. Time does not always resolve difficulties; it usually makes it worse.

Need help with learning issues? Contact Beth Silver, The Education Sage, at 310-720-0390 or bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Beth’s website is education sage.net.

I Can’t Take Class Notes!

Taking class notes is a skill most students need. Students experience various degrees of success with taking class notes. There are some students who just cannot take class notes because they cannot mutitask – that is listen and write at the same time.

If a student has difficulty taking class notes, there are some solutions. One is to get notes from a fellow student. Another is to get the teacher notes and the student can use that as a guide to add more notes. If the teacher uses a powerpoint, getting the powerpoint before the class lecture and discussion will be good because it can serve as a guide.

What about recording a lecture and discussions? This is a possibility. Permission is needed from the teacher to do the recording. It means the student has to re-listen to the lecture and discussion again and can stop the recording to take notes. This takes more time.

There is a smart pen that records the lecture and discussion as the student is using it to write notes. This functions as a recording and the student can go back and re-listen to the lecture and discussion.

The G.P.A. and College Entrance

The G.P.A. stands for grade point average. This is the average of all courses taken for college entrance credit. It is one of two most important numbers. The other is the board score for S.A.T. or A.C.T. There are some schools that have made the board testing optional. This makes the G.P.A. even more important.

The question about how many honors courses or AP courses should be taken is always debated. Grade bumps are usually given in these courses. That is, if a student gets a B in a course, the grade is bumped to an A. This definitely affects the G.P.A. There are two G.P.A. scores on transcripts. One is weighted- with the grade bumps. The other is unweighted-without the grade bumps.

It is necessary to balance the course load for a student so that the highest G.P.A. possible for the individual can be achieved. It is important to note that in courses that give grade bumps, the curriculum is covered more quickly and in more depth than the regular college preparatory classes. For every hour in the seat in one of these courses, the student can expect 1.5 to 2 hours of work to do on the outside of class to be successful. That means in a 5 day week, up to an additional 10 hours of work can be expected in the form of homework and studying. Be careful in designing the course load for a student.

Questions? I provide help for learning skills in the summer- in person or online: preview next year’s math course, get summer reading requirements done, work on writing skills, learn how to put information into memory and retrieve it for tests and polish reading comprehension skills. Contact Beth Silver. Email: educationsage.net. Phone 310-720-0390.

Learning Skills and Summer

How do you keep your student’s skills alive and well during the summer vacation from school? There are various ways but it is important to pay attention to keeping skills polished.

Reading is one of the ways to help students during the summer. Depending upon a student’s schedule, reading for a minimum of four days a week is suggested. Select books that the student really wants to read. Work with a children’s librarian to select books that are appropriate and readable for your student.

Reviewing math from the previous school year is important. If possible, have your student learn the first three chapters of the new math book for the coming school year. Make sure there are word problems in the work being done. The reading skills for these problems are vital.

Writing skills are necessary. Have your student write a blog about summer and post on the blog at least three times a week. Keeping a diary is another good tool to sharpen writing skills.

Make sure you check with your student’s school to see if there is required reading during the summer. This required reading becomes the first material covered as soon as school begins.

I am available to help students during the summer. We can work online or in person. Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email:bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Phone: 310-720-0390.

 

After Spring Break……….

After Spring Break is an important time for students of all ages. The time to the end of the school year or the end of a quarter is short. Things tend to go quickly and sometimes furiously!!

This is the time high school teachers must make sure that they cover the curriculum in the amount of time remaining. Make sure your student keeps up with the pace of learning, testing and projects. Final exams come quickly. Make sure your student is prepping for those in advance. This is also the time of year for standardized tests such as AP, SAT 1, SAT 2 and ACT.

Get your student to finish the school year strong. Make sure the work is understood and completed on time. Encourage your student to meet with teachers to find out what the final exam will contain or what the final project will be.

This is the time to make sure your student is enrolled for the coming school year. If you have finished enrollment, take another good look at the combination of courses your student will be taking. Adjustments can be made if necessary.

Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email:bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Phone: 310-720-0390.