I Can’t Take Class Notes!

Taking class notes is a skill most students need. Students experience various degrees of success with taking class notes. There are some students who just cannot take class notes because they cannot mutitask – that is listen and write at the same time.

If a student has difficulty taking class notes, there are some solutions. One is to get notes from a fellow student. Another is to get the teacher notes and the student can use that as a guide to add more notes. If the teacher uses a powerpoint, getting the powerpoint before the class lecture and discussion will be good because it can serve as a guide.

What about recording a lecture and discussions? This is a possibility. Permission is needed from the teacher to do the recording. It means the student has to re-listen to the lecture and discussion again and can stop the recording to take notes. This takes more time.

There is a smart pen that records the lecture and discussion as the student is using it to write notes. This functions as a recording and the student can go back and re-listen to the lecture and discussion.

The G.P.A. and College Entrance

The G.P.A. stands for grade point average. This is the average of all courses taken for college entrance credit. It is one of two most important numbers. The other is the board score for S.A.T. or A.C.T. There are some schools that have made the board testing optional. This makes the G.P.A. even more important.

The question about how many honors courses or AP courses should be taken is always debated. Grade bumps are usually given in these courses. That is, if a student gets a B in a course, the grade is bumped to an A. This definitely affects the G.P.A. There are two G.P.A. scores on transcripts. One is weighted- with the grade bumps. The other is unweighted-without the grade bumps.

It is necessary to balance the course load for a student so that the highest G.P.A. possible for the individual can be achieved. It is important to note that in courses that give grade bumps, the curriculum is covered more quickly and in more depth than the regular college preparatory classes. For every hour in the seat in one of these courses, the student can expect 1.5 to 2 hours of work to do on the outside of class to be successful. That means in a 5 day week, up to an additional 10 hours of work can be expected in the form of homework and studying. Be careful in designing the course load for a student.

Questions? I provide help for learning skills in the summer- in person or online: preview next year’s math course, get summer reading requirements done, work on writing skills, learn how to put information into memory and retrieve it for tests and polish reading comprehension skills. Contact Beth Silver. Email: educationsage.net. Phone 310-720-0390.

Learning Skills and Summer

How do you keep your student’s skills alive and well during the summer vacation from school? There are various ways but it is important to pay attention to keeping skills polished.

Reading is one of the ways to help students during the summer. Depending upon a student’s schedule, reading for a minimum of four days a week is suggested. Select books that the student really wants to read. Work with a children’s librarian to select books that are appropriate and readable for your student.

Reviewing math from the previous school year is important. If possible, have your student learn the first three chapters of the new math book for the coming school year. Make sure there are word problems in the work being done. The reading skills for these problems are vital.

Writing skills are necessary. Have your student write a blog about summer and post on the blog at least three times a week. Keeping a diary is another good tool to sharpen writing skills.

Make sure you check with your student’s school to see if there is required reading during the summer. This required reading becomes the first material covered as soon as school begins.

I am available to help students during the summer. We can work online or in person. Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email:bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Phone: 310-720-0390.

 

After Spring Break……….

After Spring Break is an important time for students of all ages. The time to the end of the school year or the end of a quarter is short. Things tend to go quickly and sometimes furiously!!

This is the time high school teachers must make sure that they cover the curriculum in the amount of time remaining. Make sure your student keeps up with the pace of learning, testing and projects. Final exams come quickly. Make sure your student is prepping for those in advance. This is also the time of year for standardized tests such as AP, SAT 1, SAT 2 and ACT.

Get your student to finish the school year strong. Make sure the work is understood and completed on time. Encourage your student to meet with teachers to find out what the final exam will contain or what the final project will be.

This is the time to make sure your student is enrolled for the coming school year. If you have finished enrollment, take another good look at the combination of courses your student will be taking. Adjustments can be made if necessary.

Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email:bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Phone: 310-720-0390.

Teachers Who Pick on Kids or Play Favorites!

Students are a captive audience in a school classroom. They have no way of protecting themselves from emotional outbursts from a teacher. When a teacher decides to embarrass a student, all of the students in that classroom are affected.

A student experienced a very uncomfortable situation this morning as one of her teachers embarrassed, criticized and belittled other students in her class. She felt most uncomfortable. She had to expend her energy dealing with the emotions she was experiencing instead of being able to concentrate on the subject matter. This happened in a high school Advanced Placement class. Why?

Students in this class are bright or they would not have qualified for the class. In my opinion, the teacher should have had conferences with the individual students. This type of interaction is a form of bullying. No teacher should be allowed to do this. No student should have to experience this.

If your student is having this type of problem, the first thing is to talk with the teacher and second to contact the administration. Your student is entitled to be in a safe environment in a school classroom. The teacher should not ride over the safety rites of students by being a bully.

Question? Contact Beth Silver. Email:bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Phone 310-720-0390.

Views on Extra Credit

Students look for extra credit work from their teachers. Teachers vary in their view of extra credit.

Some teachers look at extra credit as a burden to be assigned and graded. These teachers feel that students should do the required work and do it well. They have constructed a curriculum that they feel will give students everything and all information necessary to become competent learners in their classes.

Other teachers use extra credit to broaden the scope of their curriculum. Some feel that the extra credit gives students a boost and will help improve grades. Others feel it builds good relationships with students. The teachers who use extra credit do not see it as a burden and are happy to correct it, give credit and hep students achieve well.

Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email:bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Phone: 310-720-0390. Beth’s website: http://www.educationsage.net

Organize, Organizing, Organization and Organized

One of the best skills for anyone of any age is to be organized. It is extremely important for a student to have all their materials organized in a way that makes them easily accessible.

Help your student with the organization of the work area at home. Make sure paper, pens, pencils, erasers and binders are in good working order. I often have students come with a very battered binder. Their statements are usually the same – I can make it last a few more weeks. In those few more weeks, assignments can be lost and irreplaceable hand outs and worksheets can be lost. A binder in good working order is necessary. Check your student’s backpack!

Using an agenda or planner is another vital skill. Your student should enter homework, planned learning work and all activities. The planner should be one that includes everything that is happening in a student’s life. Knowing when events might interfere with homework and learning is important so a student can plan how to get all of it done.

Families have been using family calendar apps on their phones. This is another very valuable tool. This way, everyone in the family knows what is happening. It helps parents plan transportation for their students.

Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email: bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Phone 310-720-0390.