I Can’t Take Class Notes!

Taking class notes is a skill most students need. Students experience various degrees of success with taking class notes. There are some students who just cannot take class notes because they cannot mutitask – that is listen and write at the same time.

If a student has difficulty taking class notes, there are some solutions. One is to get notes from a fellow student. Another is to get the teacher notes and the student can use that as a guide to add more notes. If the teacher uses a powerpoint, getting the powerpoint before the class lecture and discussion will be good because it can serve as a guide.

What about recording a lecture and discussions? This is a possibility. Permission is needed from the teacher to do the recording. It means the student has to re-listen to the lecture and discussion again and can stop the recording to take notes. This takes more time.

There is a smart pen that records the lecture and discussion as the student is using it to write notes. This functions as a recording and the student can go back and re-listen to the lecture and discussion.

Early Warning Signs

School has been in session long enough this year for possible problems to appear. It is important to look at these areas: student getting along with teacher(s); student completing homework; student’s scores on tests and student’s attitude about going to school.

The best way to begin to handle issues in these areas is to meet with the classroom teacher(s). Sometimes just clarifying what the teacher expects of the student is enough to bring clarity to how the student should be working. In a meeting such as this, the student will appreciate getting the teacher’s attention and understanding more about how to work.

Don’t wait when things start to be issues. Time does not always resolve difficulties; it usually makes it worse.

Need help with learning issues? Contact Beth Silver, The Education Sage, at 310-720-0390 or bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Beth’s website is education sage.net.

Get Organized

Get organized! Make sure your student has everything needed with which to do homework, study and projects.

Teachers may have different requirements for classes. Make sure your student knows the difference and has the proper materials.

Extra binder paper, pens, and pencils are important.

Make sure your student has times when to do homework. A quiet study area is important. The kitchen table is not the best place for doing and learning school work. If the student needs supervision, find a place where checking with the student is easy but out of the way of the flow of other household activities.

Need help with your student? Contact Beth Silver at 310-720-0390 or bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Beth’s website is educationsage.net.

Test Study Technique

A test study technique I use is called the A-B-C method. I ask the student to label all vocabulary and concepts with an A, B or C.

A means that the student knows the information without hesitation.

B means the student knows the information but is somewhat hesitant in explaining it.

C means the student does not know the information and needs to work to learn it.

Then the student should start with the C’s. After really learning the C’s, the student should work on the B’s. Then the student should just review the A’s 3 days before the test.

What is really important here is that the student is honest about his/her knowledge. It is important to stress that it does not make any difference the number of C’s because they are going to really learn them.

Need help with a student? Contact Beth Silver, The Education Sage, at 310-720-0390 or bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Beth’s website is educationsage.net.

College Application Time

This is the college application season . Some students have already done their applications. For those beginning, make sure time is set aside to enter information and do essays.

A student should make a list of possible schools. Some should be “sure-shots”- the student is confident of being accepted; some should be fair chance – the student has a good chance of being accepted; and some should be reaches – the student probably may not be accepted.

Essays should be well written. It is important for the student to “come alive” on paper so an admissions counselor can understand the person behind the application.

Need help? Contact Beth Silver at 310-720-0390 or bethcarolsilver@gmail.com.