Learning Information by Leveling for Tests

The starting place for getting ready to take a test is gathering all of the information that needs to be learned. This can be: a study guide, class notes, worksheets, handouts and the end of a chapter in a textbook. Make sure all material needed for the test is gathered.

The next step is to level the information according to the individual student’s knowledge. There is a simple A-B-C method to use. Mark all vocabulary and concepts with an A, B or C. A means that the information is well known and does not need to be learned but only reviewed. B means that the information is partially known and learning needs to happen. C means that the information is not known at all and must be learned. It is important for the student to be honest when making these marks.

The next step is to start with the C’s. Count how many C’s there are and then put them on a calendar to know when to learn them. Do the same thing with the B’s. A’S should be reviewed two days prior to the test. All learning should be put on a calendar to know when to learn the information.

Have questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email:bethcarolsilver@gmail.com or Phone: 310-720-0390

Textbooks Online – Know the Parts

Many schools use textbooks online. The students access them through the use of Chromebooks or iPads. This is a good cost savings method. The only problem is that the student does not pay attention to how the pieces of the textbook can be helpful.

Have your student locate the Table of Contents, the Glossary and the Index for the online textbook. There may also be answers to problems- math text, chemistry text or physics text. When students are given class notes and they need additional information, they can use these resources to find answers to their questions.

Another good reference source is online videos. You Tube and Khan Academy have many informative videos. This is a way for a student to hear the lesson that was given in class again. It is also possible to replay the video as many times as is necessary to understand the information.

Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email: bethcarolsilver@gmail.com Phone: 310-720-0390.

What are Cumulative Files or Records?

Cumulative School Files contain information about a student. This information includes: grades, disciplinary comments and school administration input.

Parents should ask to review their students’ cumulative files. This is to make sure that the contents are not negative or derogatory to the student. Parents have the right to expunge such information from the cumulative files. In the future, if a student applies for a government job, the cumulative record may be accessed. Negative comments could hurt the student’s chances of getting a position.

Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email: bethcarolsilver@gmail.com Phone: 310-720-0390.

Following Directions – Oral and Written

Following directions is a life long skill. There is a standing joke in my family which is if all else fails, read the directions!

Following oral directions in any phase of life is important. It is particularly in the school classroom. Some teachers are easier to listen to than others. If the verbal delivery is paced evenly most students will be able to follow it. If the instructor goes at a fast pace, it is possible that students will not be able to follow and comprehend the information. If a student has a fast paced instructor then there are a couple of things to do. Ask for instructor notes to be given. The other thing is to search for an online video which contains the same information to listen to and comprehend. The online video can be replayed which helps most students.

Written directions are important. There are times, however, when students look at a page and think they know what to do and don’t read the directions. This is especially true in the case of written test directions. Encourage your student to read the directions.

Have Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email: bethcarolsilver@gmail.com Phone: 310-720-0390.

Textbooks and Copyright Dates

Most students and parents do not look at the copyright dates of textbooks being used. The textbooks are accepted as a tool that is not to be questioned.

It is important to note that by the time textbooks are published and receive a copyright date the information can be as old as three years. In certain subjects, the age of the information doesn’t matter. What does matter is including current material for students to learn. That is why teachers are constantly supplementing textbook information with hand-outs. Teachers may tell their students that they are not using the textbook because of the age of the information published in it.

Schools have a difficult time keeping up with the advancements of new publications of textbooks because of the cost. Most textbook prices are quite high. A Lot of textbooks cost over $100.00 if they are purchased new.

Questions? Contact Beth Silver. Email bethcarolsilver@gmail.com. Phone: 310-720-0390.